film terminology

Description

Basic Film terminology for my intro to film course.
Julia Taveras
Note by Julia Taveras, updated more than 1 year ago
Julia Taveras
Created by Julia Taveras over 8 years ago
18
1

Resource summary

Page 1

CINEMA: LINGUA INGLESA E CULTURA 14510IDIOMAS SEM FRONTEIRAS UFACPROF. JULIA TAVERASTERMINOLOGIASHOT : The image a viewer sees on screen until it is replaced by another image through an editing technique. The building block of all filmmaking.FRAMING : How the subject will be positioned within the shot. There are almost unlimited variations on these shots. LONG SHOT : The onscreen object appears small or is seen from some distance away. Gives sense of time and place.Allows viewer to decide where to look because there is so much visible onscreen. CLOSE UP / HEAD SHOT : The onscreen object appears to be large, taking up about 80% of the screen.Forces the viewer to see what the director intends.Intimate and revealing, though somewhat intrusive and authoritative. MEDIUM SHOT : Between a long and close up shot.Most common & naturalistic.Doesn’t call attention to itself.Neutral shot.SOFT FOCUS : Ever-so-slightly out of focus. Can create a lighter mood or uncertainty.RACK FOCUS : Brings either the background or foreground into sudden focus. Forces viewers to focus their attention on one thing.DEEP FOCUS : All objects, both background and foreground, remain in focus.Freedom for viewers to choose which objects to view.LOW ANGLE : In which the camera is below the subject. Characters shot from low angles tend to be more powerful, commanding.EYE LEVEL : In which the camera and subject are on the same level. Neutral shot.DUTCH ANGLE : In which the camera is slightly canted or tilted. Used to indicate tension, uncertainty, or danger.PAN : During which the camera pivots along the horizontal axis, sweeping to the left or right.Often used to introduce a setting, as characters take in (admire) a situation or new surroundingsTILT : During which the camera pivots along the vertical axis, tilting up or down.Often used to communicate size, distance, or strength.ZOOM : During which the focal length of the lens changes, making the object shrink or grow in perceived size.Directs the audience’s attention to an object or detail which the director feels to be important.TRACKING / DOLLY SHOT : During which the camera actually moves in accordance with the onscreen action.Brings the audience into the action, no longer spectators.LOW-KEY : Lighting distinguished by darkness, shadows, and patches of bright key light.Often used to create moods of suspicion, mystery, and danger.HIGH-KEY : Lighting distinguished by brightness, openness, and lack of shadow or contrast.Often used to make characters or situations seem to be without misunderstanding or threat.LIGHTINGNEUTRAL : Lighting is even and balanced throughout the shot. BOTTOM / SIDE : Light only illuminates part of a subject, often a face.Indicates characters who may be evil, ambiguous or conflicted. FRONT : No shadows appear.Indicates innocence or opennessSOUND DIEGETIC : Sound which can logically be heard by a character within the film environment.Background noise, traffic, dialogue, etc. NONDIEGETIC : Sound which can not logically be heard by a character within the film environment.Musical scores, voice-over narration, etc. INTERNAL DIEGETIC : Sound which only one character can hear, while others cannot.Internal monologue, supernatural voices, etc.EDITING : The methods by which a director or editor moves from one shot to another.FADE : The image onscreen fades to black for a period of time, to be slowly replaced by another image.Often indicates the passage of a period of time or the end of a segment. DISSOLVE : The image onscreen slowly fades, but not to black - instead it fades to another image which slowly fades in at the same time.Often makes a connection between 2 objects or characters that the viewer may not have made otherwise. CROSSCUT / PARALLEL EDITING : Images showing clips of separate places, quickly transitioning from one to the other and back again.Creates suspense, linkages between characters, themes or plots. FLASHBACK / FLASHFORWARD : A convention designed to give the viewer important information about past events.Conventions include verbal cues ( “ I remember when…”), and dissolves. EYE-LINE MATCH : Three or more shots: a shot of a character, a shot of what the character sees, and a shot of the character’s reaction.Develops characterization, builds tension, revelation, etc. RHYTHM AND DURATION : The length of time between editing methods LONG TAKE : When a shot lasts more than 20 or 30 seconds.Can create a calmer, more peaceful environment (sometimes).MISE-EN-SCENE: A theatrical term which describes what appears onstage or on camera.Can refer to sets, costumes, props, lighting, acting, etc.Source: Scott Bradley Intro To Film Technique & Terminologyhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oFUKRTFhoiA

Show full summary Hide full summary

Similar

Phrasal Verbs
GoConqr suporte .
Phrasal Verbs II
GoConqr suporte .
Apresentação em Inglês
GoConqr suporte .
English General Quiz
Luiz Fernando
Simulado Inglês
Marina Faria
English - prepositions (at, in, on)
jdbenthien
Prática para o TOEFL
GoConqr suporte .
Preposições em inglês
GoConqr suporte .
Gramática para o First Certificate I
GoConqr suporte .
Gramática para o First Certificate II
GoConqr suporte .
Todos os verbos irregulares em inglês com tradução
Luiz Fernando